Civil Liberties, Cybersecurity and the Future of Modern Society

Civil Liberties, Cybersecurity and the Future of Modern Society

Recent revelations of pervasive surveillance, sharp rises in cyberattacks, and non-disclosure of vulnerabilities in consumer products render former policy insufficient. They also compel us to question what steps to take towards a better internet – one that is secure, sensitive to privacy, and accessible to all.

Blue Oyster Cult in Tehran: The Roots and Manifestations of Anti-Americanism in Iran, 1963-1978

Blue Oyster Cult in Tehran: The Roots and Manifestations of Anti-Americanism in Iran, 1963-1978

[women vote for the first time in 1963]

The Iranian Revolution of 1979 defies reductive categorization. Third Worldist, Islamic Marxist and radical Shi’i ideologies converged and proliferated throughout Iranian society during the movement to end the autocracy of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. These factions developed and disseminated radical political ideas reflecting socio-economic and cultural grievances that emphasized themes of anti-Americanism in visual media.

Let’s Hash It Out: Hashtags as a Linguistic Innovation in 21st Century Political Discourse

Let’s Hash It Out:  Hashtags as a Linguistic Innovation in 21st Century Political Discourse

My Facebook newsfeed was ablaze as I scrolled through countless posts ending in #Ferguson, #BlackLivesMatter, and #HandsUpDontShoot. Moments earlier, a Missouri court had ruled not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed young black man. Friends of mine had swiftly taken to the internet to voice their outrage, disgust, and demands for action. Within minutes of the decision, millions of similar posts had already surged across the Internet -- but the public outcry didn’t stop there.

'The Politics of Lies': Rhetoric and the Post-Truth Age

'The Politics of Lies': Rhetoric and the Post-Truth Age

In the opening of Eugene O'Neill's play The Iceman Cometh, two fishermen drunkenly discuss the value of the truth. "To hell with the truth!" one of them exclaims, "It's irrelevant and immaterial, as the lawyers say. The lie of a pipe dream is what gives life to the whole misbegotten mad lot of us, drunk or sober."

Satirizing a Spectacle

Satirizing a Spectacle

[Charlie Chaplin in The Great Dictator]

During the 2016 presidential election, people turned to satirical news television shows for coverage of the latest dramatic events impacting the campaign. Satire has long been revered as a powerful form of media with the ability to use humor to reveal imperfections and an underlying truth. However, as James Poniewozik observes in his article “Donald Trump is a Conundrum for Political Comedy” in The New York Times, Donald Trump’s larger than life public persona, cultivated by his preexisting celebrity and coaching for reality television has rendered him unspoofable

The Linguistic Dehumanization of the Immigrant in America

The Linguistic Dehumanization of the Immigrant in America

The history of immigration in the United States is long and storied. Like most stories, it is best told with words. But the words used to describe immigrants in America are not what one would expect from a nation founded on, built by, and dependent on immigration. In fact, the language used can be thoroughly degrading to the point of dehumanization.

A note from the editor

A note from the editor

In the recent elections, the rhetorical styles of the two major candidates were often juxtaposed, seen as representative of their broader aptitude for politics. And, there is no doubt that eloquent rhetoric has long been a mainstay of the democratic political system. Here at the Review, we selected Rhetoric as our guiding theme this month because we wanted to explore its changing paradigms, the ways in which its norms have evolved with the times, birthing a radically new political landscape.

A note from the editor

A note from the editor

There are as many conceptions of what defines a city as there are cities. Our city, New York, invites such intense identification from its residents (particularly transplants, like most of us are) that the pursuit of becoming an authentic “New Yorker” has become a minor obsession. “I [heart] New York,” read the endless tee-shirts. But does New York love us back?

The War On Terror

In a heated debate on whether the U.S.A should end the War on Terror, the proposition took the lead with a 8-7 vote and 2 abstentions in their favor. The opposition debaters Akash Lodh and Hamza Mazhar argued that the U.S.A can't end the War on Terror due to the losses because this would create a vacuum in the process of addressing terror today.  Professor James Traub and Thomas Resnick laid out some compelling arguments that the U.S.A still has the means to end the war on terror. They argued that the U.S.A should pursue this course of action due to the prolonged and unnecessary damage it has caused to innocent people. 

To find out more click here and view footage of the debate! 

Reform Proposals for the NYC Choice Program

Reform Proposals for the NYC Choice Program

I am proudly the product of public education — growing up, I attended the schools that were located in my district zone, and my transition to high school was simple and seamless. However, learning and working within the New York City public school system quickly made me realize the luxury I had been afforded as a young girl and made me aware of the convoluted primary school experience in NYC.

Each year, the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) encourages students who attend low performing schools to participate in the Public School Choice (PSC) program. School choice allows students to apply to a range of schools across the city, rather than attending the school within their assigned zone. The school selection process is meant to create greater educational equity for economically disadvantaged students, promote competition between schools, and integrate schools across the city at large.

Theatre of War: Who is it For?

Theatre of War: Who is it For?

The Theatre of War Series is a collection of three plays that was performed at the Gallatin Arts Festival on Thursday April 14th in front of an audience of mostly Gallatin students and faculty. Just under an hour long, with a cast of five, the performance was a mid-process showcase of the dramatic material we have come up with since we began this project. For Gwen, the urge originated from an in depth exploration of the ambiguity of Bertolt Brecht’s war play, Mother Courage and Her Children, through experimental workshops with actors. For Henry, it began with a close study of war and the body in German literature from World War I and the Thirty Year’s War. Sitting down late one night in January, while reviewing a barrage of emails from professors we had reached out to as potential mentors in creating a tutorial analysing theatre of war, we thought: why not question the strange urge to study this topic--why not write our own pieces? So we did.